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Which Dog Breeds Are The Most Aggressive?

Secrets to Dog Training

Put An End To Your Dog's Aggressive Behavior Today!

A lot of people have misconceptions when it comes to which dog breeds are most aggressive and which ones aren't. Aggressive dog breeds generally exhibit behavior that's meant to scare or intimidate other animals or people. You can tell if a particular breed has aggression issues by the way it acts. You should especially pay attention when you are selecting a puppy. Is it the bully of the group, or quite shy and timid? Either case can lead to uncontrolled aggression, whether out of dominance or out of fear. Uncontrolled, regular growling, snarling, biting and lunging are dead giveaways that something's up with the dog.

Don't just look at a dog's breed when selecting one. Even the gentlest of breeds can be violent ones, especially if they aren't given enough socialization and training. Did you know that the breeds that are more likely to bite are the ones people rarely think about - like the cuddly toy poodle or the Jack Russell Terrier?

Beware of THESE Dogs.

The truth of the matter is, all dogs can be provoked or egged on to bite. There's no such thing as a "bad" breed. Practically all kinds of dogs are trainable. Proper training and socialization can make otherwise violent dogs, such as pit bull terriers and Rottweilers, adorable and gentle ones.

Dog owners should have their beloved pets trained to follow basic commands like come, sit, lie and stay. Obedience training school is one way of effectively preventing many dog-biting incidents, but you should try to find time for day-to-day instruction between dog and master, as well. This helps build the bond between you and your dog; when your dog trusts you enough, he dare not attack other people, particularly YOU.

Here's a look at the various dog breeds that are considered potentially aggressive.

  • Chow Chows are one-person dogs that tend to bite without any warning. They are also a bit ferocious around strangers, and can be quite a tenacious fighter. So make sure to discipline this dog and set right from wrong, immediately.
  • The Papillon is fiercely loyal of their owners - to a fault. They can be quite possessive and standoffish to strangers.
  • Old English Sheepdogs are very protective of their owners so they might be aggressive if anybody tends to be too close to its owners.
  • A Llasa Apso often gets cranky around kids.
  • Rottweilers are extremely protective of their masters.
  • Chihuahuas aren't too fond of kids. They'd rather be with adults than play around with tots.
  • Toy Poodles bite people and other animals out of self defense. Unfortunately, 'playing' according to you may be perceived as a form of 'attack' to them.
  • Dachshunds aren't known for their patience.
  • Jack Russell Terriers are feisty creatures who require early training to prevent long-term biting and digging problems.
  • Giant Schnauzers are very dominant. They often challenge adults, particularly strangers.
  • Cocker Spaniels often suffer from a dangerous genetic disease known as "rage syndrome." This syndrome causes spontaneous violent action against not strangers, but actual family members. Many Spaniels have been put down because of this unwanted behavior. Check with the breeder to ensure your Spaniel is free from this dangerous dog disease.
  • The Pekingese isn't all that tolerant of strangers.
  • Miniature Pinschers usually have aggression issues because they've got this "big dog-little body" mind set going on.

Here's a rundown of breeds that are typically gentle but can't shake off their "bad dog" image.

  • Boxers are pretty good with kids. They are good watchdogs, but will only become aggressive
  • Bulldogs are very playful and gentle.
  • Great Danes, while considerable in size, happen to be kind and affectionate.
  • Mastiffs are especially quiet and docile.
  • German Shepherds are great with kids too. These are courageous, fiercely loyal dogs who, if trained properly, will be extremely gentle to family and guests.
  • Rottweilers are also capable of tenderness and affection. They have a bad rep, but if they trust you, you'll never have to worry.

In truth, most pit bulls aren't really as aggressive as they're made out to be. They tend to be loving, gentle and playful. But there are some that have been raised and trained to be highly aggressive. Such pit bulls tend to be more aggressive toward other animals than people. Aggressive pit bulls often have a history of being abused or neglected, and getting trained specifically to fight. Pit bulls that have been mistreated are seen as being extremely dangerous, so avoid them. If you own one, treat it gently and lovingly.

Whether you've got a puppy or a full-grown dog, what's important is that you give it the attention and care it deserves. Recognizing and heeding the warning signs of potential dog aggression problems will make it easier to deal with them at an early stage. When in doubt about something dog-related, consult with a qualified veterinarian and/or animal behaviorist.

If you are concerned about your dog's aggression issue's and are ready to take action right now, then read our reviews of the top Dog Aggression Guides available online.

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